Collaborative Care

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Be afraid, be very afraid.
There are two graphs that I have seen that make me quite worried about healthcare and the majority of the public in need of healthcare. The “one” (really two) above is definitely one of those.
The report from the New York Times summarizes the recent release of the 2011 Employer Health Benefits Annual Survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation.
From the Times:
"A new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit research group  that tracks employer-sponsored health insurance on a yearly basis, shows  that the average annual premium for family coverage through an employer  reached $15,073 in 2011, an increase of 9 percent over the previous  year."
Yes, healthcare cost continue to rise and often the public must take on these additional costs as employers are running out of places to find the money to pay this benefit.
What happens if nothing changes?
Well it just so happens that the other graph that scares me is  from the Robert Graham Center and is an example of what could happen:

Essentially this graph shows that by the year 2025 the annual household income in the US will be surpassed by the average health insurance premiums.
They conclude:
"Shifting health care coverage from a commodity to a social good could  reduce disparities and produce better population health. Changes in  health care coverage will require more equitable and sustainable models  of health care delivery and aligned advocacy to support them. The  instability of health care financing and delivery provides an  opportunity for family physician leaders to develop new models of  efficient practice, with care that is accessible to everyone."
So in the face of statistics like the ones mentioned above, how will we respond? Healthcare expenditures and premiums are growing at an uncontrollable rate. When cells do this we call it cancer - when healthcare does this, what do we call it? 
Now is the time to start to demonstrate that there are indeed innovative models of healthcare that are out there that can bend the cost curve, improve quality and enhance overall healthcare.
Let your voice be heard.
The CMS Innovations Center has a section where you can send in your ideas on healthcare. How many ideas have you sent in?
Let’s try and avoid coming to a place where the average family cannot afford healthcare insurance.

Be afraid, be very afraid.

There are two graphs that I have seen that make me quite worried about healthcare and the majority of the public in need of healthcare. The “one” (really two) above is definitely one of those.

The report from the New York Times summarizes the recent release of the 2011 Employer Health Benefits Annual Survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

From the Times:

"A new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit research group that tracks employer-sponsored health insurance on a yearly basis, shows that the average annual premium for family coverage through an employer reached $15,073 in 2011, an increase of 9 percent over the previous year."

Yes, healthcare cost continue to rise and often the public must take on these additional costs as employers are running out of places to find the money to pay this benefit.

What happens if nothing changes?

Well it just so happens that the other graph that scares me is  from the Robert Graham Center and is an example of what could happen:

Essentially this graph shows that by the year 2025 the annual household income in the US will be surpassed by the average health insurance premiums.

They conclude:

"Shifting health care coverage from a commodity to a social good could reduce disparities and produce better population health. Changes in health care coverage will require more equitable and sustainable models of health care delivery and aligned advocacy to support them. The instability of health care financing and delivery provides an opportunity for family physician leaders to develop new models of efficient practice, with care that is accessible to everyone."

So in the face of statistics like the ones mentioned above, how will we respond? Healthcare expenditures and premiums are growing at an uncontrollable rate. When cells do this we call it cancer - when healthcare does this, what do we call it? 

Now is the time to start to demonstrate that there are indeed innovative models of healthcare that are out there that can bend the cost curve, improve quality and enhance overall healthcare.

Let your voice be heard.

The CMS Innovations Center has a section where you can send in your ideas on healthcare. How many ideas have you sent in?

Let’s try and avoid coming to a place where the average family cannot afford healthcare insurance.

  1. collaborativecare posted this
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